THRIVHER INTERVIEW: Corinne Bot

Updated: May 21, 2018



Thrivher Achievements:


Created Polyglot Group, a leading global boutique consultancy company dedicated to helping businesses expand & optimise their operations with a global footprint spanning over 9 time zones.



Current professional job title:

Founder and CEO of Polyglot Group




Thrivher dive:


● Current position: Raising people to be whatever they want.

● Can't start my day without: A coffee, if not, two.

● Most effective day to day productivity tool is: Balance and being aligned with my values.

● Practical day to day tool: My pen and paper for my daily to do list.

● Best read of all time: Le Petit Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery, because it's about an adult going back to his childhood, it talks about being here for a purpose and the purpose of others. It's not the business, money, a car, glamour, it's human beings that count the most.

● For inspiration: I take time out, reflect and learn to love who you are.

● Non-negotiable: Taking time for my loved ones, including family and friends and time for myself.

● Mindful habits: I go into the garden every morning and sit down for 10 minutes and be present, that gives me serenity for the day.

● I let my hair down by: Dancing, reading and going out.




Thrivher Survivor Moves:


Back to the very beginning, what was your very first paying job?

I was a qualified hairdresser for my Mum’s Salon. I'm actually a French champion! But had to stop this activity for health reasons pretty early.


How did you get on your path that eventually lead you to starting Polyglot Group?

After the hairdressing, I briefly looked at journalism but didn’t turn out how I expected at all. I worked as a CSR for an Iron and Steel company where I was introduced to HR and discovered through working there that it was HR (Human Resources) I wanted to do. So I went back to university and studied HR, while working full time.


I never knew I wanted to do this originally but sometimes you discover things by accident. Now it all makes sense because HR is about people. Even as a hairdresser, it's amazing what people tell you, it's like being a psychologist. So, I discovered that I enjoyed working with people right from the start.


Before you started your business Polyglot, what was that the last job you had?

I was working as recruitment consultant for an Australian company.


What made you give that position up?

The company wouldn't give me the flexibility I needed when I became a mother, but also my husband's company moved everything to Perth, so I resigned.


Did you have any fears leaving your job?

No not at all, when I was in my consultancy role, I had a gut feeling that something was not aligned. I wanted to spend more time with my girl but I hated that I was made to feel I had to choose between being a mother and having a career. I didn’t want to stop doing either.


I wanted to spend more time with my girl but I hated that I was made to feel I had to choose between being a mother and having a career

Did you have any concerns around leaving your regular salary?

No but I was able to do that because my husband had a good job. It was better with two incomes yes but we could survive with one. Also I didn’t have a mortgage until I was 40 so this made it easier too.


How did your business Polyglot come about?

My former clients (when I was a Recruitment Consultant) started to contact me, even when I was living in Perth, so when we came back to Sydney after 18 months I met with one of them said to me, "Corinne, I really want you to recruit our CFO, let's do a deal. We can work out a flat fee, I can give you the key to our office and you can work as an independent consultant for us and do it from our office". With that I realised, I didn’t need anybody else. I could work as an independent consultant 3.5 days a week and spend the rest of the time with my children. I thought this idea was great and so it began.


With that I realised, I didn’t need anybody else. I could work as an independent consultant 3.5 days a week and spend the rest of the time with my children.

Did you ever have a plan?

For the business, initially I didn't have any plan at all. The first plan I made was after the first 12 months. It was really thriving and I had taken on 3 staff already so we had to become a corporation. At the time I thought: I have two choices, either I leave it small, or I grow it.


I went for the later. I also decided that if we were going to be bigger I would not be a slave to it. It’s grown to the company it is today because of the brilliant team we’ve put in place along the way. Now, even when I'm not in there, it's working. I can go for a week in LA to see my son for his graduation and it’s still running as it should.


It's not about finding a business, but it’s about finding and constructing your ideal life. After all, why do we do business? For money or for the life we want?


It's not about finding a business, but it’s about finding and constructing your ideal life. After all, why do we do business? For money or for the life we want?

What career advice do you wish you had understood when you first started your business?

To not feel guilty. I used to feel too guilty. I have learned to fight the guilt. I would have suffered less if I’d learned this earlier on. Also, to choose your battles, because you can't fight them all and it will get you nowhere. I would have been much more efficient if someone told me this earlier.


What has kept you going in your hardest times of running the business?

It’s the passion, and the feeling that I love what I'm doing that kept me on this path to get what I have. The passion in terms of day to day passion. Honestly, I don't feel like I've got a job.


Has there been a specific person that is always been supportive or encouraged you?

My husband and better half, unconditionally. Tomorrow, if I say I don't want to do Polyglot anymore. He will follow and support me, because the most important thing in our lives is each other. He really believed in me more than I believed in myself at the beginning.


What are you most afraid of in life?

I was afraid of not making a difference. I'm not anymore. I can die tomorrow, I mean, I don't want to die and I'm not finished in what I would like to achieve but through my children, the business and my achievements to date, I feel I've made a difference.




Thriving and Kicking:


What skill would you still like to master?

Public speaking - I hate it. I don't hate it, but I am out of my comfort zone. Imagine, English is not my mother tongue. I'm always scared of saying something that people won't understand or with a funny accent.


What three personality traits do you think have helped you establish what you have today?

Adaptability, common sense and no ego. If you are adaptable, you can change things. When you run a company, you are initiating most of the change. Some don't like it, but you have to embrace it!


For women who are in a career who have this burning desire to do more, what advice would you give them?

You have to listen to your inner self, be positive and you've got to take a risk. There has a to be a risk to achieve your life goals.


I also think if you are destined to do something amazing you will because of your attitude.


I also think if you are destined to do something amazing you will because of your attitude.

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