Lisa Messenger's Answers to Thriving Interview

Updated: Apr 26, 2020



The game-changing founder and CEO of Collective Hub, international speaker, best-selling author, and an authority on disruption in both the corporate sector and the start-up scene.


 

The ‘Answers to Thriving' is an interview series that takes a look at the women who have taken action to pursue a life purpose, goal or ambition. We uncover key moments, lessons and habits that have influenced the life they lead today.

 


Can’t start the day without: A Green Smoothie

Go-to coffee: An Iced Latte

Top music track: Any 90s remixed dance tracks generally

Favourite quote: 'Here’s to the crazy ones. Because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change world are the ones who do' – Steve Jobs

Most afraid of: Nothing anymore. I learnt some big lessons over the past 18 months, which you can read about in my book, Risk & Resilience!

Go-to to have fun or let your hair down: A spin or dance class




Looking back, when was the very first time you realised your life mission and how did that take shape initially?

Nothing for me was linear or happened in the order people would expect. I guess it really started for me in 2012, but it was the culmination of years of business and personal growth in equal measure that led me to a point where I was strong enough to produce Collective Hub. I remember I woke up one morning and I decided I had to produce a magazine! It was completely illogical because at that time print was essentially dead or dying and it was a highly saturated market. It went against everything that should have been, but my passion was so deeply ingrained in me that I just had to do it. I think once you get to a point where you’re absolutely clear about your reason for being, or your passion, then the “how?” has a way of working itself out. I believe that once you absolutely know what it is that you came here to do, synchronicity and serendipity kick in and things start to unfold.


I think once you get to a point where you’re absolutely clear about your reason for being, or your passion, then the “how?” has a way of working itself out.


What specific events led you to your realisation?

In 2004, I did a course called the Hoffman Process, which was an eight-day, highly cathartic, integrated course and that started me on my track. I stopped doing a lot of self-sabotaging things and I became very clear about who I was, probably for the first time in my life. On a more practical level, I had been running businesses for over a decade, exploring different industries and pushing myself from a business perspective. It was a case of many things coming together at once that gave me the strength and courage to take the plunge and launch Collective Hub. Essentially it was born out of frustration because so much of the media focuses on gossip and superficial things, rather than trying to make a positive contribution to the world. Frustration can be a very motivating and energising force, if you make the decision to harness it to propel you forward, rather than seeing it as something that is holding you back.


Frustration can be a very motivating and energising force, if you make the decision to harness it to propel you forward, rather than seeing it as something that is holding you back.



Once you had become clear about your mission to be the entrepreneur for entrepreneurs, what were your first practical steps towards making it a reality?

What I would say is that naivety can be a great thing. I literally had no clue - I had never worked in media. All I had was my idea, to bring inspirational people together in some format and tell their stories, in order to inspire people. A magazine seemed to make sense to me. I literally just started googling “how to start a magazine” and “what do you need in a magazine”, finding out what I needed to get this venture started. By taking a leap of faith I ended up achieving a lot more than if I had over analysed and waited until I was more informed. Later, other editors and publishers have commented on the fast success of Collective Hub – if I had heard their comments at first, I probably wouldn’t have been so bold! So, naivety can be wonderful!


My advice is just to go ahead and start something but allow it to morph and evolve as you learn and progress. I think that it’s really important not to be too attac